Enterprise scenario use-case: Parallelization

Prancer enterprise edition proposes interresting features that compensate's the basic editions scalability. If you have a very big infrastructure to manage, you might want to use a distributed approach when running tests so you don't have to wait for too long.

Containers

The reason containers exist in the first place is to help you better structure your tests and snapshot. At the same time, containers play another role: They help with parallelization of your testing.

When you have a large infrastructure, you'll need multiple runners to query your infrastructure and run tests. You can do this without enterprise support and even without database storage but it will be a complex task.

Database setup

If you want to leverage parallelization of your Prancer setup, you will need multiple runners, they could be AWS or Azure virtual machines or just multiple developer machines. You will need a common MongoDB server that all will connect to and then feed that database with the configuration that everyone will share.

This setup can be done in a CI/CD pipeline scenario as a temporary setup/tear-down scenario or more permanent solution.

Permanent setup

A permanent setup, with or without enterprise support would look like this:

  1. Setup a MongoDB server as a permanent solution
  2. Feed the MongoDB server with the configuration files using the utilities presented in the last chapter

Then, manually or through a CI/CD process:

  1. Start/Bring up/Install prancer on multiple runners
  2. On each runner, start the validation tool, each with it's own container prancer <container>

Non-permanent setup

A non-permanent setup would be used in a complete setup/tear-down solution on every run of your CI/CD pipeline. You should use this setup only in a basic edition scenario. If you have enterprise support, instead, you should opt for a permanent solution.

Notes: Edition differences

We strongly recommend using a permanent setup and the enterprise edition once you need parallelization.

  1. Setup a MongoDB server as a temporary solution
  2. Feed the MongoDB server with the configuration files using the utilities presented in the last chapter
  3. Start/Bring up/Install prancer on multiple runners, you cannot use more runners than you have containers
  4. On each runner, start the validation tool, each with it's own container prancer <container>
  5. Export the test-output if you need it
  6. Tear-down the MongoDB server

Post run data

If you use the database storage approach, you should always consider doing some backups of your data. This is especially true in non-permanent setups or you will run your tests and then lose the data once the pipeline cleans up everything.

In all cases, it is a good approach to always export your test data to a build artifact. In the next section you will see how to backup your MongoDB server or export your test results or more to send them to build artifacts.